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Ptosis Repair

Person who is a candidate for ptosis surgery

What is PTOSIS?

Ptosis is the medical term for drooping of the upper eyelid, a condition that may affect one or both eyes. When the edge of the upper eyelid falls, it may block the upper field of your vision.

The ptosis may be mild in which the lid partially covers the pupil, or severe – in which the lid completely covers the pupil. Ptosis that is present at birth is called congenital ptosis.

Female Ptosis repair & upper lid blepharoplasty.

What are the Causes

In children, the most common cause is improper development of the levator muscle, the major muscle responsible for elevating the upper eyelid. With adults, it may occur as a result of aging, trauma or neurologic disease.

As you get older, the tendon that attaches the levator muscle to the eyelid stretches and the eyelid falls, covering part of the eye. It is not uncommon for a patient to develop upper eyelid ptosis after cataract surgery. In most cases, however, this may improve with observation.

Ptosis can also be caused by injury to the oculomotor nerve (the nerve that stimulates the levator muscle), or the tendon connecting the levator muscle to the eyelid.

What are the Symptoms

Symptoms of ptosis include difficulty keeping your eyes open, eyestrain, and eyebrow aching from the increased effort needed to raise your eyelids. In severe cases, it may be necessary to tilt your head back or lift the eyelid with a finger in order to see out from under the drooping eyelid (s).

Are There Other Conditions Associated with PTOSIS?

Children with ptosis may also have amblyopia (“lazy eye”), strabismus (eyes that are not properly aligned or straight), refractive errors, astigmatism, or blurred vision.

The condition may be the first sign of myasthenia gravis, a disorder in which the muscles become weak and tire easily. Ptosis is also present in people with Horner’s syndrome, a neurologic condition that affects one side of the face and indicates injury to part of the sympathetic nervous system.

What are the Treatments?

Congenital ptosis is treated surgically, with the specific operation based on the severity of the ptosis and the strength of the levator muscle. Ptosis surgery usually involves tightening the levator muscle in order to elevate the eyelid to the desired position. In severe ptosis, the levator muscle is extremely weak and a “sling” operation may be performed, enabling the forehead muscles to elevate the eyelid (s).

The main goals of ptosis surgery is an elevation of the upper eyelid to permit normal visual development and a full field of vision, and symmetry with the opposite upper eyelid. It is important to realize that when operating on an abnormal muscle, completely normal eyelid position and function after surgery may not be possible to achieve.

Children with ptosis should be followed closely, both before and after surgery, with eye exams on a regular basis to ensure that their vision is developing properly. Surgery in adults and older children is usually performed as an outpatient procedure under local anesthesia, and with the patient lightly sedated with oral and/or intravenous medications.

For younger children, less than fourteen years of age, general anesthesia is typically used to allow the patient to sleep through the operation.

What are the Risks and Complications

In addition to the removal of the sutures, minor bruising or swelling may be expected and will likely go away in one to two weeks. Bleeding and infection, which are potential risks with any surgery, are very uncommon. As with any medical procedure, there may be other inherent risks that should be discussed with your surgeon.

Who Performs the Surgery

Patients are most commonly treated by ophthalmic plastic and reconstructive surgeons who specialize in diseases and problems of the eyelids, tear drain, and orbit (the area around the eye).

You should look for a doctor who has completed an American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (ASOPRS) fellowship. This indicates your surgeon is not only a board-certified ophthalmologist but also has had extensive training in ophthalmic plastic surgery. When you are ready, you will be in very experienced hands. Your surgery will be in the surgeon’s office, an outpatient facility, or at a hospital depending on your surgical needs.

Ptosis Repair, Eyelid Blepharoplasty & Intern

locations

Serving Our Community

Minnesota Eye Consultants is proud to offer patients convenient access to eye care across the Twin Cities. We have 4 locations, each with an onsite ambulatory surgery center (ASC).

11091 Ulysses St NE
Clinic: Suite 300
ASC: Suite 400
Blaine, Minnesota 55434
Additional Blaine Information
9801 Dupont Ave S
ASC: Suite 100
Laser Procedures: Suite 120
Clinic: Suite 200
Bloomington, MN 55431
Additional Bloomington Information
10709 Wayzata Blvd
ASC: Suite 100
Laser Procedures: Suite 120
Clinic: Suite 200
Minnetonka, MN 55305
Additional Minnetonka Information
12501 Whitewater Drive, Suite 310
Minnetonka, MN 55343
Additional Crosstown – Coming March 2024 Information
7125 Tamarack Rd
Clinic: Suite 100
ASC: Suite 200
Laser Procedures: Suite 250
Woodbury, MN 55125
Additional Woodbury Information